Researching a Conscript
Guest Post - Research in France on a Carignan Soldier, Part 2

Guest Post - Research in France on a Carignan Soldier, Part 1

 

MWT

 

For quite a few years, now, we have regularly received interesting correspondence from one of our Dear Readers, the excellent genealogist and researcher, Gail Moreau-DesHarnais. She is an expert on the genealogy of the early French residents of Detroit and has kindly agreed to the posting here of her detailed presentation on the research of a specific Carignan soldier. We hope that the procedures she describes may provide ideas that will be of help to you.

After determining whether an individual is/was indeed a Carignan soldier or not [1], then check the following resources below in footnote no.2 for a possible location of birth/baptism in France [2]. I chose Jean Magnan dit Lespérance for two reasons:

  1. A connection to the beginning of Détroit 1701-1710;
  2. No one else has found anything about his birth/baptism in France.

Jean Magnan dit Lespérance arrived in Québec on 12 September 1665 on board the ship le Saint-Sébastien as a soldier in the Company of Captain La Varenne [3]. He married Marie Moitié on 9 March 1672 in Montréal. Their marriage act is below. It is indicated that Jean Magnan was the son of Pierre Magnan and Denise Amiot from the parish of Hedin bishopric of Bourges en Berry. I then went to Fichier Origine to see if any work had been done on Jean Magnan [4]. There were three men with the surname of Magnan but no connection and nothing on Jean Magnan dit Lespérance. I decided to see if Jetté had any more information. Jetté indicated that Jean Magnan was from Dun-sur-Auron, arrondissement (district) of St-Amand-Mont-Rond, archbishopric of Bourges, Berry. It is in the modern department of Cher [5].

  GMDH1

GMDH2

 

The next step was to go online to www.francegenweb.org/archives.htm. This is the site of WikiGenWeb and Archives en ligne.

  • On the right, click on Archives du Cher en ligne.
  • Then click on “archives en ligne.”
  • Then under archives numérisées, click on registres paroissiaux et état civil. You will have to set up an account (free) by putting in your e-mail address and chosing a pass word.
  • Then under archives numérisées, click on registres paroissiaux et état civil.
  • The term commune will appear , then click on the symbol that represents a list of the communities. Put in Dun-sur-Auron, baptême, and the years 1635-1644. It will bring up the following:

Dun-sur-Auron

Avant 1793, la commune de Dun-sur-Auron s'appelait Dun-le-Roi, nom qu'elle reprendra sous la Restauration. Par décret de 1880 elle prendra définitivement le nom de Dun-sur Auron. Par ordonnance du 4 décembre 1822, la commune de Cuzay-Sainte-Radegonde est supprimée et son territoire rattaché à la commune de Dun-sur-Auron.

Communes liées: 

  • Cuzay-Sainte-Radegonde  - Par ordonnance du 4 décembre 1822, la commune de Cuzay-Sainte-Radegonde est supprimée et son territoire rattaché à la commune de Dun-sur-Auron. Autre nom : Cuzay-Radegonde (Révolution)
  • Dun-le-Roi - Avant 1793, la commune de Dun-sur-Auron s'appelait Dun-le-Roi, nom qu'elle reprendra sous la Restauration. Par décret de 1880 elle prendra définitivement le nom de Dun-sur Auron.

I went through all the baptisms from 1635 to 1641 which should have covered the period Jean Magnan would have been born. The only age given for him is age 41 in the 1681 census. I found nothing. Also, of importance, I found no Amiots or Magnans.

I then went to PRDH to see what their interpretation of his place of birth/baptism was. Two pieces of information are given:

  1. The accurate recording of the place of origin of Hedin as stated in the marriage act;
  2. Jean Magnan dit Lespérance’s birth about 1640 in Vesdun, archbishopric of Bourges, Berry (arrondissement of St-Amand-montrond, Cher) [6]. I then went back to the Cher Archives online, going through the same steps as above, and went to the town of Vesdun. The earliest records online, unfortunately, are for 1676-1677, 1680-1681. I went through all the records for 1676, 1677, which included baptisms, marriages and burials. I found no Magnans but did find in July 1677 a Catherine Amyot, daughter of the deceased Mathieu Amyot and Anne Bagy from the near-by parish of Culan, marrying Pierre Orlaut (sic) from the parish of Vesdun. I then checked the parish register for Culan and did find some Amyots there but no Magnans.

 

(To Be Continued)

 

Read the comments to this post here.

NOTES:

[1] The best source for accuracy about the identity of Carignan soldiers is Michel Langlois, Carignan-Salières 1665-1668 (Drummondville: La Maison des Ancêtres, 2004), 336, 337. [Hereafter, Langlois Carignan.]

[2] (1)  René Jetté, Dictionnaire généalogique des familles du Québec des origines à 1730 (Montréal: Les Presses de l’Université de Montréal, 1983); (2) www.genealogie.umontréal.ca (PRDH) – a paid site; (3) Michel Langlois, Dictionnaire biographique des ancêtres québécois (1608-1700) Tome 3, lettres J à M (Sillery: La Maison des Ancêtres, 2000) [Hereafter, Langlois Dictionnaire.]; (4) L’Abbé Cyprien Tanguay, Dictionnaire généaloqique des familles canadiennes depuis la fondation de la colonie jusqu’à nos jours, Premier Volume depuis 1608 jusqu’à 1700 (Province de Québec: Eusèbe Sénécal, imprimeur-éditeur, MDCCCLXXI) – Facsimilie Reprint Edition 1996 by Quintin Publications.

[3] Langlois Carignan, 401.

[4] www.fichierorigine.com  This is a good site to determine the possible place of birth / baptism of an individual in France.  If a date and place are stated but no record is shown (numérisé), it is always wise to see if you can find that record and verify it.

[5] Jetté, 751.

[6] PRDH #47373, marriage, #52779, Individual, accessed 25 October 2014.

©2015 Anne Morddel 

French Genealogy

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